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For someone who wears progressive lenses (think bifocals), sunglasses are never an afterthought. And, as a hunter and angler, good vision both near and far is a necessity. Add in WileyX safety ratings and I can’t imagine a better product for the modern sportsman in the field.

WileyX Prescription Captivate lenses raise the bar for comfort, clarity and color enhancement on the water or in the field. Photo by Dan Eichinger

Recently, I put a new pair of prescription Captivate lenses to the test while fishing a deep canyon on Colorado’s South Platte River. Chasing those wiley rainbows, browns and cutthroats was made easier with the clarity and enhanced color of the new shades. I clearly could see fish in their feeding zones and the structure I needed to navigate perfect drifts both on the surface with Caddis and with nymphs below around the rocky stream beds.

 

The changing light of a deep canyon is no match for these sunglasses, and they kept me on the water later into the evening than seemed possible. This kind of polarizing clarity deep into the golden hours has tremendous value for me.

WileyX Captivate lenses on the Twisted frame. Photo by Lew Carpenter

Wearing a pair of WileyX sunglasses is comfort and confidence on the water. My days of squinting from side glare and marginal polarization are long over. This is my second pair of prescription WileyXs – the first pair still working as fine as ever – and I’m grateful every time I tie on a size 22 midge on the trout steams or a Rat-L-Trap in the Louisiana marsh.

NEWTOWN, Conn. — NSSF® the firearm industry trade association, marked a milestone achievement when firearm and ammunition manufacturers topped $14.1 billion in contributions to the Wildlife Restoration Trust Fund since its inception in 1937.


“This is truly a remarkable win for wildlife conservation,” said Joe Bartozzi, NSSF’s President and CEO. “This fund has been responsible for the restoration and recovery of America’s iconic game species, including the Rocky Mountain elk, whitetail deer, pronghorn antelope, wild turkeys and a variety of waterfowl. It is also responsible for funding the recovery and conservation of nongame species, including the American bald eagle, reptiles, fauna and conservation lands that allow them to thrive. The firearm industry is proud to perform such an important and vital function to ensure America’s wildlife remains abundant for future generations.”


The Wildlife Restoration Trust Fund, commonly known as the Pittman-Robertson fund or Firearms and Ammunition Excise Tax, is a tax paid by firearm and ammunition manufacturers on the products they produce. The excise tax is set at 11 percent of the wholesale price for long guns and ammunition and 10 percent of the wholesale price for handguns. The excise tax, paid by manufacturers and importers, applies basically to all firearms produced or imported for commercial sales, whether their purpose is for recreational shooting, hunting or personal defense. The tax is currently administered by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) in the Department of the Treasury, which turns the funds over to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).


USFWS then deposits the Pittman-Robertson revenue into a special account called the Wildlife Restoration Trust Fund, which is administered by the USFWS. These funds are made available to states and territories the year following their collection.


These 10 to 11 percent excise tax dollars collected since 1937 under the Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act are specifically designated to be used by state wildlife agencies for conservation. Collectively, purchasers of firearms and ammunition, hunters and the industry are the greatest source of wildlife conservation funding.



About NSSFNSSF is the trade association for the firearm industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of thousands of manufacturers, distributors, firearm retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers nationwide. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.

WASHINGTON (April 22, 2020) — The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will create jobs and improve the nation’s resilience to climate change by dedicating $1.4 billion annually to proactive, voluntary, locally-led efforts to help wildlife at risk.  

“America’s wildlife are in crisis. One-third of all species in the country currently face a heightened risk of extinction. This bill represents a bold, bipartisan vision for how we can recover wildlife and create jobs in every state across the nation,” said Collin O’Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. “There is important work just waiting to be done restoring habitat, removing invasive species, stopping wildlife diseases, reducing water pollution, and mitigating the harm from climate change. This bill will put people to work today protecting our wildlife heritage for tomorrow.

“Representatives Dingell and Fortenberry’s steadfast leadership on this bill is a shining example of how Congress can still find common ground on conservation even in these polarized times. We’re confident the bill will be signed into law by President Biden this year.”

More about the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act: 

  • The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act dedicates nearly $1.4 billion annually to prevent vulnerable species from declining to the point where they need the protections of the federal Endangered Species Act while providing a significant new source of funding for species that already are federally protected.
  • Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI) and Congressman Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE) reintroduced an updated version of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act with House Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ), Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA), Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-ME), Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), Rep. French Hill (R-AR), Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA), and Rep. Jenniffer González Colón (R-PR).
  • Last session’s House bill had 185 bipartisan cosponsors and was reported out of the House Natural Resources Committee with an overwhelming 26-6 vote. A version of the bill passed the House as part of the infrastructure package, H.R. 2 Moving Forward Act. In the 115thCongress, the bill had 116 cosponsors, with a nearly even split between Democrats and Republicans.
  • The state-led wildlife recovery efforts funded by this bill will be guided by the Congressionally-mandated State Wildlife Action Plans, which identify specific, science-based strategies to restore the populations of species of greatest conservation need. These plans identify more than 12,000 species that need conservation assistance.
  • Tribal Nations would receive $97.5 million annually to fund proactive wildlife conservation efforts by Tribal wildlife programs and on Tribal lands.
  • The bill requires at least 15% of the funding to be spent on threatened and endangered species. States with the most federally-listed endangered and threatened species, such as Hawaii, will receive significantly more funding from this version of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act.
  • The bill complements the highly successful Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (Pittman-Robertson) and Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act (Dingell-Johnson), which facilitated the recovery of a range of species including large mammals, game birds, and sportfish that once faced extinction.
  • A 2018 report, Reversing America’s Wildlife Crisis: Securing the Future of Our Fish and Wildlife, found that one-third of America’s wildlife species are at increased risk of extinction. More than 150 U.S. species have already gone extinct and an additional 500 species have not been seen in recent decades and are regarded as possibly extinct.

Well the attack is on again,

The Humane Society of the United States has once again submitted a Citizen’s Petition to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to Ban the Use of Cage Traps in Colorado.  

This is a call to Action.

For 3 years in a row now they have attempted to impose their will on the Wildlife Management Community.  We have been successful the last 2 years in defeating this assault and we are asking for your Support in kicking them back to their corner.

The virtual landscape creates a difficult situation for our community.  While virtual testimony will likely be significantly limited an email campaign to the Commission is imperative.

By March 16th please send an email to the Commissioners of Colorado Parks and Wildlife and ask them to oppose this frivolous and nefarious petition.  Tell them that the Professionals of Colorado Parks & Wildlife should continue to manage our Wildlife in the State of Colorado and not let an agenda driven Animal Rights Group take the tone and narrative that continually attacks the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.  

The Cover Letter and the Petition that HSUS has filed along with all of the Commission email addresses can be found here: http://coloradotrapper.com

Please be brief, concise, professional and explain to them why they should not allow this to happen.  

Whether you bow hunt, big game hunt, bird hunt, predator hunt, or are an avid angler standing together is a necessary means of victory and sustainability. We must unite.

Dan Prenzlow at dan.prenzlow@state.co.us

Marvin McDaniel at marvin.mcdaniel@state.co.us

Carrie Hauser at carrie.hauser@state.co.us

Marie Haskett at marie.haskett@state.co.us

Taishya Adams at Taishya.Adams@state.co.us

Betsy Blecha at betsy.blecha@state.co.us

Charles Garcia at charles.garcia@state.co.us

Dallas May at Dallas.May@state.co.us

Duke Phillips at Duke.Phillips@state.co.us

Luke Schafer at Luke.Schafer@state.co.us

James Tutchton at James.Tutchton@state.co.us

Eden Vardy at Eden.Vardy@state.co.us

Thank you for your Support.  If you have any questions please feel free to reach out.  See attachments.

Chair

Dan Gates

719 269-7972

CPW, DNR, members of the Colorado Outdoor Partnership (CO-OP) and regional partners will discuss a concept for a new statewide initiative to support and encourage locally driven collaborative solutions for ensuring that Colorado’s outdoors thrives.

When: Jun 18, 2020, 9:00 AM Mountain Time

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://cpw-state-co.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XO52rpULQUSJ1QBenPdJvw

Elevenmile Reservoir. Photo by Rich Holland

Partners are exploring the development of Outdoor Regional Partnerships around the state in a manner that supports existing coalitions. CPW is also considering how this initiative could support the development of a future statewide conservation and recreation plan (SCORP).

Can we unite local and statewide priorities into a comprehensive shared vision and strategy? Would this help to ensure that Colorado’s growing love for the outdoors is in accord with conserving the state’s habitat, productive agricultural lands, and equitable opportunities for outdoor recreation? Join this Partners in the Outdoors session to learn more about this new initiative and how you can help with its development.

Speakers:

Dan Prenzlow, Director, Colorado Parks and Wildlife 

Doug Vilsack, Assistant Director – Parks, Wildlife and Lands, Department of Natural Resources

Kevin Alexander, Associate Vice President in Academic Affairs, Western Colorado University 

Carlos Fernandez, Colorado State Director, The Nature Conservancy, Colorado Field Office

Ann Baker Easley, Chief Executive Officer, Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado

Becky Leinweber, Executive Director, Pikes Peak Outdoor Recreation Alliance

Moderator – Jody Kennedy, Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Recreation infrastructure often is supported by LWCF funding, providing access to hunters and anglers. Photo by Lew Carpenter

Boat ramps, bathrooms, public open space, picnic tables, recreation infrastructure – simple things we often forget about until we can’t use them (due to pandemics or lack of maintenance). The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) often is a little-known financial backbone for communities that support hunters, anglers and outdoor recreation users in their wild pursuits.

LWCF generates new jobs, creates new opportunities for recreation and provides fuel for state and local economies. For more than five decades it has helped create and maintain parks, hiking and biking trails, ballfields, waterfront access, hunting and fishing access and so much more in nearly every county in the United States.

Since inception in 1965 LWCF has pumped $219,100,000 into Louisiana’s vast recreation and wildlife infrastructure.

When Congress created the Land and Water Conservation Fund in 1965, it devised a funding mechanism that would use offshore oil revenues instead of taxpayer money. The fund is entitled to receive $900 million a year, but only twice in its history has it received the full amount since Congress usually diverts funding to non-conservation projects. The permanent full funding bill currently coursing through Congress will finally remedy that situation so the Land and Water Conservation Fund will be able to reach its full potential.

Recently permanently authorized, but not fully funded – I know, it makes no sense – LWCF is in the crosshairs of current federal legislation. And, there are many reasons why you should care.

Since its inception in 1964, the LWCF program has established many of our nation’s most coveted public lands that generate billions of dollars for state and local economies. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, outdoor recreation supports $778 billion in annual consumer spending and 5.2 million jobs across the country. While LWCF enjoys broad support for these clear economic benefits, the program relies on a standing account of the United States Treasury which is subject to constant diversions from its intended purpose.

Permanent authorization of LWCF in 2019 was an important step in addressing these issues, but it did not ensure that all of the funds identified for LWCF are used for their intended purpose. This underfunding has created a backlog of conservation and recreation access needs in every state across the country. Therefore, Congress must pass legislation now to provide full and dedicated funding for LWCF at the authorized level of $900 million.

Bassmaster Magazine Editor James Hall lands a nice keeper redfish in the marsh

Lowering your boat to the river or marsh by rope without a launch sucks. So does erosion at epic scale making access difficult at best. We need public infrastructure now more than ever. We need to keep people hunting, fishing, recreating and we need to support communities that support our sport!

Recreation infrastructure development provides jobs, too, in places that will badly need them in the coming years. So now, when Congress is rightly focused on how to stimulate the economy, many leaders are realizing that one of the solutions is right in front of them. 

Across the country there are scores of shovel-ready projects just waiting for LWCF funding. These projects will provide jobs in construction, restoration and conservation. That in turn will provide additional opportunities for American families to get outside to hunt, hike, bike, camp, fish and pursue many other outdoor recreation passions. According to the Trust for Public Land, every dollar invested in LWCF returns at least $4 in economic benefits. For an investment of $900 million, that’s a $3.6 billion return.

While often unknown, LWCF funding supports access and habitat improvement to areas like Delta NWR in the bird’s foot of the Mississippi River Delta. Photo by Lew Carpenter

LWCF has helped support some of Louisiana’s most beloved public places. The list of major projects funded by LWCF in Louisiana includes:

Federal Public Land Investment ($143,000,000):

Atchafalaya NWR

Bayou Cocodrie NWR

Bayou Sauvage NWR

Big Branch Marsh NWR

Black Bayou NWR

Bogue Chitto NWR

Cane River Creole NHP

Cat Island NWR

Delta NWR

Grand Cote NWR

Isle Dernieres

Jean Lafitte NHP

Kistachie NF

Lake Ophelia NWR

Louisiana Black Bear NWR

Red River NWR

Southeast LA NWRs Tensas River NWR

Upper Ouachita NWR

Forest Legacy Program ($340,000)

Habitat Conservation, Sec. 6 ($500,000)

American Battlefield Protection Program ($450,000)

State Program, Total State Grants ($74,900,000)

Total: $219,100,000

To get a detailed look at LWCF investment in Louisiana since the 60s, see here: http://projects.invw.org/data/lwcf/grants-la.html

Now is the time to recommit this investment in conservation and restoration to begin the economic healing from the pandemic. Providing full and permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund will produce jobs for the unemployed, provide new parks and hiking trails for our health and well-being, and stimulate our local economies with new recreation opportunities for generations to come.

Anglers rely on recreation infrastructure to access Louisiana’s vast waterways. Here, Eric Cosby yanks a fine redfish from Louisiana waters.
Photo by Lew Carpenter

So when that big bruiser of a redfish crushes your lure, the sea trout stack up in your cooler, the call from offshore gifts you with a cow yellowfin tuna, or taking that brace of blue winged teal – after thanking the hunting and fishing gods, tip your hat to a quiet American program that supports communities in their ability to support you. It matters.

Click Here to Support Permanently Funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund >>

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The world’s largest trade show for target shooting, hunting, outdoor and law enforcement products attracts attendees from 113 countries

LAS VEGAS — The 42nd Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade ShowSM (SHOT Show®) opened today at the Sands Expo Center, where a record 2,600 companies will exhibit products related to target shooting, hunting, outdoor recreation and law enforcement.

SHOT Show spans four days, Jan. 21-24, with additional show-related events in Las Vegas creating “SHOT Week” that include a fundraiser golf tournament to support healing veterans, Industry Day at the Range and SHOT UniversityTM, a professional development series.

SHOT Show attracts nearly 60,000 professionals representing 113 countries from the firearms and outdoor industry.

Owned and sponsored by the National Shooting Sports Foundation® (NSSF®), the firearms industry trade association, SHOT Show is the largest trade show of its kind in the world. The show is open to trade professionals only and not to the public. No firearms are transferred at the show. Consumers will see the products unveiled at SHOT Show on retailers’ shelves throughout the coming the year.

The 2020 SHOT Show marks the 22nd time the show has been in Las Vegas. It has been at the Sands Expo continuously the last 11 years.

SHOT Show provides a significant economic contribution to the Las Vegas and Nevada business communities, pumping more than $88 million in non-gaming revenue into the economy. The record 2,600 exhibiting companies occupy more than 692,000 net square feet of exhibit space, completely filling the Sands Expo. To satisfy a huge waiting list of companies seeking to be part of the show, SHOT Show will expand in 2021 into exhibit space at the new Caesars Forum.

This demand for exhibit space at the show reflects the high interest Americans have for firearms ownership and recreational shooting equipment. NSSF surveys show that some 40 million Americans would like to learn more about the shooting sports.

Firearms safety is a major theme of the show, with the industry’s leading gun safety initiatives — NSSF’s Project ChildSafe®, Operation Secure Store®, Fix NICS®, Don’t Lie for the Other GuyTM and its suicide prevention program, collectively known as “Real Solutions. Safer CommunitiesSM”— looking to expand their industry partnerships, with the goal of helping to further reduce firearms accidents, thefts and misuse. For the first time, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which has partnered with NSSF to help reduce the rates of suicide by firearm, will have a booth at the show to promote participation in the AFSP-NSSF Suicide Prevention Program.

NSSF also will be promoting its +ONESMMovement encouraging hunters and target shooters to mentor newcomers, as well as its National Shooting Sports Month®, a celebration of recreational shooting taking place every August.

SHOT Week includes the 6th Annual NSSF/HAVA Golf Classic in support of Honored American Veterans Afield, a firearms industry-run charitable organization that helps the healing of disabled combat veterans and their reintegration back into normal life through participation in hunting and shooting sports.

The two-day Supplier Showcase is a show-within-a-show, with 540 third-party OEM suppliers meeting with exhibiting manufacturers and exploring their needs for extrusions, fabrication, fabrics, machinery, metal, plastics, software, logistical support and tools. The event has more than doubled in size since its introduction at the 2017 show.

The 2020 SHOT Show will continue for the second year its one-day Pop-Up Preview section, where 260 exhibitors will showcase clothing, footwear, cameras, tents and other gear that today’s hunters and outdoors enthusiasts demand.

Education is an important part of SHOT Show and includes the full-day SHOT University and a variety of shorter Retailer Seminars taking place throughout the show week for retailers, as well as a dedicated law-enforcement education program. In the past, presenters have included representatives from ATF, FBI and the National Instant Criminal Background Check System. Through its FixNICS initiative, NSSF has helped to significantly improve the FBI’s NICS database by adding the names of persons prohibited from legally owning or possessing a firearm.

On the day before SHOT Show opens, Industry Day at the Range, with more than 200 exhibitors, provides hands-on experience with hundreds of firearms, ammunition, optics and vehicles to more than 1,600 invited outdoor media members and buyers. NSSF is the title sponsor of the event. More than 2,400 members of the trade press cover SHOT Show.

SHOT Show is the largest event conducted at the Sands. Some 12.5 miles of aisles lead to displays of firearms, ammunition, gun safes, locks and cases, optics, shooting range equipment, targets, training and safety equipment, hunting accessories, law enforcement gear, hearing and eye protection, tree stands, scents and lures, cutlery, GPS systems and other electronics, holsters, apparel, leather goods, game calls and decoys.

Anyone with an interest in the show and new industry products can learn more at SHOTShow.org or by following the show’s news on TwitterFacebookInstagram and YouTube.

-30-

About NSSF
The National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of thousands of manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen’s organizations and publishers nationwide. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.

This fall they will feed their families locally-sourced free-range meat that has been foraging on natural grasses, leaves, nuts and berries—clean, delicious food without a trace of chemical additives.

And some will be pilloried on social media by strident voices who otherwise advocate that we move away from industrial food production and eat locally- sourced, healthful food.

They are women hunters.

It may surprise many to learn that this fall more than 1 million females over age 16 will enthusiastically take to America’s woods and waters to ethically harvest wild game. And the pheasants and ducks and deer they bring home are in most places across the American landscape more abundant than since frontier times.

Mia Anstine of Pagosa Springs, Colorado is among 18 individual female hunters across the country profiled in a revealing new book titled Why Women Hunt. The book is the first of its kind. Author and hunter K. J. Houtman of Minnesota takes an intimate look at the lives of these intrepid outdoor women. Their diverse personal stories explore what motivates them to connect—spiritually and physically—with the natural world in one of humankind’s most ancient food- gathering rituals.

Anstine is a professional hunting outfitter: “Sitting in a tree stand is tough for me personally, more than climbing from 9,000 to 13,000 feet, but I’ve taken bears, whitetail and other game animals from just sitting. I love it all. Each has its own purpose—you can learn from one method of hunting to help in another.”

Mia told the author that she wishes non-hunters understood hunting better, “but the burden is on us to help them understand. I wish they’d take a hunter education class, even if they weren’t going to hunt. Sometimes we don’t get anything after a long day. It’s not always easy and it is never guaranteed. Some people don’t know and some have a misconception fostered from watching hunting TV shows. We need to demonstrate how we achieve healthy wildlife herds and how we affect animals in a positive way through hunting.”

According to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s latest National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, 10.3 million American males hunted in 2016, a number that has been steadily declining in recent decades as traditional wildlife-sustaining habitat is obliterated by strip malls and tract housing. Fewer distracted suburban young men are hunting. However, according to the exhaustive survey, 1.1 million women hunted in 2016—and their participation is statistically holding steady.

These dedicated outdoor women—of all ages, professions, education and cultural backgrounds—make up an increasing proportion of licensed American hunters.

There is a real story here.

• Publication August 2019

• Durable laminated hardcover

• 243 pages, all color

• 8.5 x 11 inches on heavy matte stock

• Fully illustrated with 90 original color photos

• ISBN 9780999309346

• Library of Congress Control Number: 2018948565 • Printed in North America

• $49.95 exclusively from Wild River Press

Wild River Press: http://www.wildriverpress.com

Book website address: http://www.whywomenhunt.com

The national trend in fishing participation shows an increase in license sales during recent years, but not every state has shared in this growth. Some states have grown sportfishing participation at a rate that outpaces population growth, while other states have struggled to increase fishing participation. While there are many different factors that affect a state’s fishing participation rate, there are common factors for growth shared by many states.

In a recent project for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation (RBFF), Southwick Associates employed multivariate approaches for 12 states to identify which factors had the greatest positive and negative effects on fishing participation rates over a 25-year period. By determining which factors drive increases and decreases across states and then identifying those that can be influenced by state recruitment, retention and reactivation (R3) efforts, states can improve R3 approaches and strategies resulting in greater license sales and participation.

Most states that have increased fishing participation rates over the past 10 years have created wide-reaching R3 programs, often with coordinated marketing and communications strategies. In addition to R3 programs of this nature, implementing multi-year licenses and licenses valid for one year from the date of purchase positively affected every state in which they were implemented, including states with overall declining trends. Although not all findings are statistically significant, these factors analyzed here have a positive impact on participation rates, showing that there are actions that can be taken by any state in order to positively affect license sales and participation rates even in states with overall declining participation.

Ramping up large scale R3 efforts, simplifying license structures, and offering multi-year and 365-day licenses would likely increase fishing participation rates in many states. Responsive programming that addresses the needs of a state, such as meeting an urbanizing population with urban fishing initiatives, will have the greatest impact. While there are no guarantees that all of these will work in every state, these insights will help steer states’ efforts and foster the growth of sportfishing participation.

“It’s clear that ramping up R3 efforts, among other things, has a direct, positive impact on fishing license sales,” said RBFF President & CEO Frank Peterson. “This research provides support for the critical R3 work we are encouraging our state and federal agency and industry partners to undertake.”

These findings show that there are specific actions that state agencies can make to positively affect license sales and participation rates, even in states with declining participation.

By determining which factors drive increases and decreases across states and then identifying those that can be influenced by state recruitment, retention and reactivation (R3) efforts, we can improve R3 approaches and strategies resulting in greater license sales and participation.

The full report is available online here.

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