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This fall they will feed their families locally-sourced free-range meat that has been foraging on natural grasses, leaves, nuts and berries—clean, delicious food without a trace of chemical additives.

And some will be pilloried on social media by strident voices who otherwise advocate that we move away from industrial food production and eat locally- sourced, healthful food.

They are women hunters.

It may surprise many to learn that this fall more than 1 million females over age 16 will enthusiastically take to America’s woods and waters to ethically harvest wild game. And the pheasants and ducks and deer they bring home are in most places across the American landscape more abundant than since frontier times.

Mia Anstine of Pagosa Springs, Colorado is among 18 individual female hunters across the country profiled in a revealing new book titled Why Women Hunt. The book is the first of its kind. Author and hunter K. J. Houtman of Minnesota takes an intimate look at the lives of these intrepid outdoor women. Their diverse personal stories explore what motivates them to connect—spiritually and physically—with the natural world in one of humankind’s most ancient food- gathering rituals.

Anstine is a professional hunting outfitter: “Sitting in a tree stand is tough for me personally, more than climbing from 9,000 to 13,000 feet, but I’ve taken bears, whitetail and other game animals from just sitting. I love it all. Each has its own purpose—you can learn from one method of hunting to help in another.”

Mia told the author that she wishes non-hunters understood hunting better, “but the burden is on us to help them understand. I wish they’d take a hunter education class, even if they weren’t going to hunt. Sometimes we don’t get anything after a long day. It’s not always easy and it is never guaranteed. Some people don’t know and some have a misconception fostered from watching hunting TV shows. We need to demonstrate how we achieve healthy wildlife herds and how we affect animals in a positive way through hunting.”

According to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s latest National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, 10.3 million American males hunted in 2016, a number that has been steadily declining in recent decades as traditional wildlife-sustaining habitat is obliterated by strip malls and tract housing. Fewer distracted suburban young men are hunting. However, according to the exhaustive survey, 1.1 million women hunted in 2016—and their participation is statistically holding steady.

These dedicated outdoor women—of all ages, professions, education and cultural backgrounds—make up an increasing proportion of licensed American hunters.

There is a real story here.

• Publication August 2019

• Durable laminated hardcover

• 243 pages, all color

• 8.5 x 11 inches on heavy matte stock

• Fully illustrated with 90 original color photos

• ISBN 9780999309346

• Library of Congress Control Number: 2018948565 • Printed in North America

• $49.95 exclusively from Wild River Press

Wild River Press: http://www.wildriverpress.com

Book website address: http://www.whywomenhunt.com

The national trend in fishing participation shows an increase in license sales during recent years, but not every state has shared in this growth. Some states have grown sportfishing participation at a rate that outpaces population growth, while other states have struggled to increase fishing participation. While there are many different factors that affect a state’s fishing participation rate, there are common factors for growth shared by many states.

In a recent project for the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation (RBFF), Southwick Associates employed multivariate approaches for 12 states to identify which factors had the greatest positive and negative effects on fishing participation rates over a 25-year period. By determining which factors drive increases and decreases across states and then identifying those that can be influenced by state recruitment, retention and reactivation (R3) efforts, states can improve R3 approaches and strategies resulting in greater license sales and participation.

Most states that have increased fishing participation rates over the past 10 years have created wide-reaching R3 programs, often with coordinated marketing and communications strategies. In addition to R3 programs of this nature, implementing multi-year licenses and licenses valid for one year from the date of purchase positively affected every state in which they were implemented, including states with overall declining trends. Although not all findings are statistically significant, these factors analyzed here have a positive impact on participation rates, showing that there are actions that can be taken by any state in order to positively affect license sales and participation rates even in states with overall declining participation.

Ramping up large scale R3 efforts, simplifying license structures, and offering multi-year and 365-day licenses would likely increase fishing participation rates in many states. Responsive programming that addresses the needs of a state, such as meeting an urbanizing population with urban fishing initiatives, will have the greatest impact. While there are no guarantees that all of these will work in every state, these insights will help steer states’ efforts and foster the growth of sportfishing participation.

“It’s clear that ramping up R3 efforts, among other things, has a direct, positive impact on fishing license sales,” said RBFF President & CEO Frank Peterson. “This research provides support for the critical R3 work we are encouraging our state and federal agency and industry partners to undertake.”

These findings show that there are specific actions that state agencies can make to positively affect license sales and participation rates, even in states with declining participation.

By determining which factors drive increases and decreases across states and then identifying those that can be influenced by state recruitment, retention and reactivation (R3) efforts, we can improve R3 approaches and strategies resulting in greater license sales and participation.

The full report is available online here.

Photo by Lew Carpenter

WASHINGTON, DC — New legislation aimed at updating one of the nation’s foundational hunting and angling programs will strengthen wildlife management and conservation across the United States. The National Wildlife Federation urged Congress to swiftly enact the Pittman-Robertson Modernization Act.

“Ensuring a future where wildlife thrive depends not only upon our ability to restore habitat and confront threats like invasive species and disease, but equally upon our ability to engage more and diverse participants in our outdoor heritage,” said Collin O’Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. “The National Wildlife Federation enthusiastically supports Representative Scott, Representative Veasey, Representative Duncan, and Representative Dingell’s bipartisan efforts to advance both of these critical conservation goals and urge swift passage of the Pittman-Robertson Modernization Act.”

The legislation, introduced by Congressman Austin Scott, Republican of Georgia, and colleagues, would support important programs to recruit, retain, and reactivate hunters by allowing Pittman-Robertson hunter education funds to be used for hunter outreach and recruitment programs as well.

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Wiley X, Inc., a world leader in the research, development and marketing of protective eyewear and gloves for military, law enforcement, sport hunting and shooting, fishing and various extreme sports is teaming with NWF’s Vanishing Paradise to save coastal Louisiana’s wetlands.

Wiley X has been at the forefront of providing sunglasses for the toughest environments, including being a major supplier to military forces around the world. For the hunting and fishing industry, this level of quality and protection is critical to enjoying time on the water, hunting in the field and shooting on the range.

It comes as no surprise that Wiley X now invests in the resource anglers and hunters rely upon to recreate. Late this fall, Wiley X donated $10,000 to the Vanishing Paradise campaign – a program of the National Wildlife Federation. By doing so, WileyX is helping to protect the Louisiana wetlands and the bounty that sportsman’s paradise provides to thousands of anglers and hunters locally and across the nation.

“Wiley X has been in the wetlands of the Gulf for many years, developing its polarized Venice Gold lenses specifically for redfish anglers, and taking advice from

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Eric Cosby of Top Brass Tackle with monster bull redfish and Wiley X Venice Gold lenses. Photo by Lew Carpenter

those who’ve spent countless hours chasing big, bronze bulls of the marsh,” said Myles Freeman, co-owner of WileyX. “It is natural for us to support this Sportsman’s Paradise to ensure today’s anglers and future generations have the same opportunities we’ve had to fish these special waters.”

Coastal Louisiana is a sportsmen’s destination of forests, swamps, marshes, river channels, estuaries and islands that provide habitat for countless wildlife – including birds, fish, mammals, amphibians and multitudes of smaller organisms that support the food web of this region. Taken together, these habitats make up one of the largest and most productive wetland ecosystems in North America.

Coastal Louisiana is a veritable frenzy of biological productivity:

• Millions of ducks and geese winter or stopover in coastal Louisiana every year – or 70 percent of the waterfowl that use the Mississippi and Central flyways.

• Louisiana is a “Sportsman’s Paradise,” with world-class salt- and freshwater fishing opportunities, including catfish, bass, speckled trout, redfish, tuna, mahi mahi, amberjack and more.

• Menhaden – a vital species in the marine food web, and the health of their population – is critical to maintaining healthy populations of many other fish species, among other ecosystem benefits. Not only are menhaden a key food source for sport fish species like striped bass, bluefish, red drum, king mackerel, and cobia, but nearly every predatory fish, mammal and bird eats them at some point in their life cycle. (ASA)

As the coast vanishes, species are losing the habitats they need to survive

Coastal Louisiana also feeds and fuels the nation with ports connecting the U.S. to the world. Investing in large-scale coastal restoration is a win-win: It protects people, wildlife and jobs, while growing the local economy and avoiding significant future costs to taxpayers.

This conservation work comes partially from a philosophy that opportunity and access for sportsmen, boaters, birdwatchers and other recreationalists relies on clean water and good habitat; robust bait fisheries like menhaden, which drive game fish production and capacity; and it gives back in ways that touch our communities and our food sources.

“We can’t think of a better place to invest our time, energy and funding than coastal wetland restoration,” said Freeman. “By supporting a healthy Gulf Coast, we support a robust sportfishing industry, wildlife, habitat and the sportsmen and women who spend their time in the wild pursuing their passion.”

6de786bb-dd5c-4e3a-83c5-f22578b901ab-1Vanishing Paradise was launched in 2009 by National Wildlife Federation and Ducks Unlimited to advocate for restoration of the Mississippi River Delta by nationalizing the issue. The Vanishing Paradise team remains committed to restoring the Mississippi River Delta, and since the 2010 Gulf oil disaster, we have expanded our attention to advocate for restoration of other critical habitat along the Gulf Coast.

For more information, follow this link to Vanishing Paradise.

When you donate to Colorado Wildlife Federation you provide vital support to an effective, proven voice for wildlife in Colorado.

Here is the link to donate to CWF:

https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/iUPHClYvmnc2wjYJTGSyS6?domain=coloradogives.org

We advocate effectively to safeguard utterly essential wildlife habitats on public lands in Colorado.  Wildlife must have a seat at the table during planning processes and projects by Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service on the millions of acres they manage here.  

We are also working hard on two pivotal pieces of federal legislation: Recovering America’s Wildlife Act to fund recovery species of greatest conservation need in Colorado and elsewhere, and Land and Water Conservation Fund reauthorization.

Did you know that Colorado’s population is projected to increase from the current 5.6 million to 8.5 million by 2050?

That means even more wildlife habitat – especially winter ranges – and migration corridors/movement routes will need our continued active, attentive, timely monitoring and firm advocacy.

We also sit on various advisory committees, we offer here in Colorado the nationally Becoming an Outdoor Woman program, and we weigh in on many issues that are before the  Parks and Wildlife Commission.

https://protect-us.mimecast.com/s/iUPHClYvmnc2wjYJTGSyS6?domain=coloradogives.org

Please help us reach our goal of 250 donations for GivesDay.

Thanks for your support!

Colorado Wildlife Federation is a 501(c)(3) tax exempt nonprofit founded in 1953.

coloradowildlife.org
1410 Grant Street, C-313, Denver CO  80203

With countless places to roam and enjoy the great outdoors, Americans are taking advantage of these opportunities, and as they go, spending significant dollars, too. New economic reports by Southwick Associates reveal that more than 53 million Americans consider themselves sportsmen, spending over $93.5 billion in 2016 on gear, licenses, travel, clothing, gas and more. 

South Park, Colorado. Photo by Lew Carpenter

A series of reports released yesterday by the American Sportfishing Association, National Shooting Sports Foundation and the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation show that expenditures made in 2016 for hunting, target shooting and sportfishing gear and services supported 1.6 million jobs and provided $72 billion in salaries and wages. These monies also generated nearly $20 billion in local, state and federal taxes. Much of this tax revenue benefits vital conservation and educational programs that improve our outdoor areas for all who enjoy them and make hunting and shooting safer activities.

“If hunting, fishing and target shooting were a corporation, it would rank #25 on the Fortune 500, ahead of Microsoft,” says Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates. “While time spent outside may come across as something to do after the real work day is done, in reality hunting, fishing and target shooting is a critical industry, generating jobs and income for thousands of communities across the country.”

Key highlights of the reports include:



  • Each year, 35.8 million people 16 years and older take to America’s waters to fish.
  • More than 28 million people over 16 years old took to our nation’s forests and gun ranges to hunt and target shoot in 2016.
  • The number of people who participate in sportfishing, hunting and target shooting represents 16.5 percent of the total U.S. population.
  • When factoring in multiplier effects, spending by sportsmen created economic activity in excess of $220 billion.
  • Hunting, fishing and shooting adds $119 billion of overall value to our nation’s gross domestic product and generates $17.6 billion in federal taxes and $12.2 billion in state and local taxes.

Four separate reports are available: sportfishing from the American Sportfishing Association, hunting and target shooting from the National Shooting Sports Foundation (please register as a guest when asked), plus a report for all activities combined from the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation.

Southwick Associates is a market research and economics firm specializing in the hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Celebrating 28 years in business, Southwick Associates has a strong reputation for delivering comprehensive insights and statistics to strategic decision making across the entire outdoor industry. Aside from custom market and economic information, Southwick Associates provides custom and syndicated research including customer-driven new product development, outdoor media consumption insights, and equipment purchase tracking studies. Visit www.southwickassociates.com for more information.

Colorado Wildlife Federation’s Becoming an Outdoors Women (BOW) has two events this summer for women interested in learning new outdoor skills.

BOW is a non-profit, educational program offering hands-on workshops to adult women. We encourage a supportive environment conducive to learning, making friends, and having fun. No experience is necessary and BOW is for women ages 18+ and all fitness levels. Please visit coloradobow.com for further details.

June 24, 2018 features a day at the range for women interested in shooting clay targets. Titled “Shotguns & Stilettos” includes lunch, raffles and door prizes. It is for novice and experienced shooters.

July 27-29, 2018 is the main event: The CWF Becoming an Outdoors Woman weekend at CSU Mountain Campus (Pingree Park).

This weekend program is for you if…

—You have not tried some of these activities but have hoped for an opportunity to learn in a comfortable setting.

—You want to improve your skills.

—You enjoy the camaraderie of other women who are interested in this menu of courses and fun weekend.

Courses include wild edibles/medicinal plants; fly fishing and fly tying; birding; archery; stream and river ecology; wilderness navigation-map and compass; ropes course; firearm cleaning and safety; grilling and smoking guru; history of Pingree Park walk; canoeing; outdoor survival/backcountry first aid and more ….

Go to coloradobow.com for information and registration.

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