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Posts Tagged ‘WWF’

 

MigrationInitiative.org_Joe Riis photo credit

Photo by Joe Riis

There will be a lot going on with multiple games, events and prizes (including outdoor gear, guns, trips…)  Don’t get caught at home – come join in the fun!

Here’s what you’ll find:
Wall of Guns
Wheelbarrow of Spirits
Hers raffle
Kids raffle
Live and silent auctions
Shot shell pull and other games

March 5th, at the Holiday Inn/Radisson, 204 W. Fox Farm Rd, Cheyenne, WY
Tickets for Sale – go online to: wyomingwildlife.org

The Wyoming Migration Initiative will be at the WWF annual fundraiser banquet.  Learn more about the Initiative, about big game migration and about WWF’s work with the Initiative.  Make your reservations for the WWF banquet now!

Entry/dinner ticket prices:
$50 per person (kids are $25)
$90 per couple

Members, bring a friend and you’ll be entered into a raffle drawing for a fabulous prize!

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Last week the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission approved new definitions developed by stakeholders and the Game and Fish Department designed to protect big game migration corridors. The Commission’s vote on Thursday came after more than a year of Mule_deermeetings and new science-based conservation strategies with the aim to mitigate impacts of development and other causes that constrain the animals’ movements.

Wyoming Wildlife Federation (WWF) Field Director Joy Bannon provided testimony in support of the new measures. “Sportsmen support multiple-use management, energy development, grazing, and other uses of our western landscapes, but we believe that all uses must be balanced with wildlife habitat needs,” says Bannon. “Meetings between sportsmen, wildlife managers, and other stakeholders enabled us to collaboratively formulate a reasonable strategy for protecting our migrating elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and pronghorn.”

The Commission passed the definitions, which will now be included in the department’s mitigation policy. Migration bottlenecks and ungulate stopover areas will be listed as “vital” under the Commission’s mitigation policy. New data has introduced the need to define migratory bottleneck – where animal movement becomes constrained, including a highway or fence – and stopover areas where animals feed and rest during migration. These new policy definitions are important as the Game and Fish Department coordinates with federal land management agencies and state agencies on common goals and decisions regarding energy development, mining, and recreational activities. These definitions represent a victory for Wyoming’s big game animals; important protections as they migrate to and from their seasonal habitats.

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WWFBanquet

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WWFlogoA new legislative bill has been filed to address WGFD funding. HB0260 will be heard by the House members of the Revenue Committee this Friday a.m. (2/1/2013). HB0260 considers fees lower than those proposed in HB0136 and will result in less revenue. However, it is the last best chance at securing funding for management of our wildlife. It is critical that you contact the House members of the Revenue Committee prior to Friday. Their contact information is supplied below.

Michael Madden (R), H40
Mike.Madden@wyoleg.gov

Gregg Blikre (R), H53
Gregg.Blikre@wyoleg.gov

John Eklund (R), H10
John.Eklund@wyoleg.gov

W. Patrick Goggles (D), H33
patrick.goggles@wyoleg.gov

Dan Kirkbride (R), H04
Dan.Kirkbride@wyoleg.gov

Bunky Loucks (R), H59
Bunky.Loucks@wyoleg.gov

David Northrup (R), H50
David.Northrup@wyoleg.gov

Ruth Petroff (R), H16
Ruth.Petroff@wyoleg.gov

Mark Semlek (R), H01
Mark.Semlek@wyoleg.gov

Please contact your legislator today!
http://www.wyomingwildlife.org

Wildlife Funding and Management Needs Your Help!

Review HB0260 at – http://legisweb.state.wy.us/2013/Introduced/HB0260.pdf

Review Revenue Committee members at – http://legisweb.state.wy.us/LegislatorSummary/CommitteeMembers.aspx?strCommitteeID=03

Bill Info – http://legisweb.state.wy.us/lsoweb/session/BillsInfo.aspx

Legislator Info – http://legisweb.state.wy.us/LSOWEB/LegInfo.aspx

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Critical wildlife habitat in Hoback Basin encompassed in lease buybacks
made possible through the Wyoming Range Legacy Act

Wyoming Wildlife Federation’s Executive Director Steve Kilpatrick address WG&F, USFS, NOLS and the WWF Board of Directors and staff at the PXP site in August. Photo: Lew Carpenter

WASHINGTON – Under a groundbreaking agreement announced today, 58,000 acres of valuable fish and wildlife habitat in a fish- and wildlife-rich region of northwest Wyoming prized by sportsmen will be permanently withdrawn from oil and gas development.

Located in northwest Wyoming’s Hoback Basin in and around the Bridger-Teton National Forest, the lands had been leased for development by Plains Exploration & Production Company, or PXP. The Trust for Public Land, a partner of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, entered into an agreement with PXP to purchase the leases; upon completion of the transaction, the leases will be retired. Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead and TPL announced news of the arrangement in Jackson, Wyo., this morning.

The Hoback Basin, a sportsmen’s paradise in northwestern Wyoming, has provided Americans with hunting and angling opportunities for more than a century and is home to outstanding elk, mule deer, moose and bighorn sheep hunting, as well as fishing for Snake River cutthroat trout.

“We are thrilled with the outcome of negotiations between PXP, the Trust for Public Land and others that will conserve critical wildlife habitat for sportsmen and other recreationists to experience and enjoy,” said Ed Arnett, director of the TRCP Center for Responsible Energy Development. “Even the most carefully planned development in this area could have further jeopardized mule deer herds already in serious decline.”

At the Hoback PXP site in August. WWF, WG&F, USFS and NOLS. Photo: Lew Carpenter

Conservation of this portion of the Wyoming Range is critically important to mule deer herds already impacted by energy development on Wyoming’s Pinedale Anticline, which has seen 60-percent losses in mule deer numbers over the past decade. The PXP leases encompass important stopover areas used by mule deer during their seasonal migrations. These areas play a critical role for mule deer – both in the spring, while the deer are building strength to reproduce and move to summer range, and in the fall, when they are gaining weight to prepare for winter.

“This agreement shows that we can find common ground between conservationists, hunters, anglers – and even oil and gas developers,” said TPL Northern Rockies Director Deb Love. “We can come together to solve our toughest problems and reach solutions that are fair to all sides.” The Trust for Public Land must raise an additional $4.25 million by Dec. 31 to complete the transaction.

The energy lease buybacks are made possible under the Wyoming Range Legacy Act, legislation whose introduction and passage was long championed by the TRCP and other sportsmen’s groups. Before his death, Sen. Craig Thomas of Wyoming conceived of the act, which was formally introduced by Sens. John Barrasso and Mike Enzi and signed into law in 2009. Among other provisions, the Wyoming Range Legacy Act allows leases to be retired permanently when purchased instead of being resold to other oil and gas companies.

“While the TRCP commends this agreement and the implementation of the Wyoming Range Legacy Act, responsible energy development begins with better planning that avoids such important areas in the first place,” concluded Arnett. “Our goal should be to eliminate the need for buyouts as a mitigation tool as we continue to develop energy resources on public lands.”

Wyoming hunters and anglers identified this area as one of the most important in the state through the TRCP’s Sportsmen Values Mapping Project.

The TRCP believes that to better balance the concerns of fish and wildlife in the face of accelerating energy development, federal land management agencies must follow the conservation tenets outlined in the FACTS for Fish and Wildlife.

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“Conserving Lands and Prosperity: Seeking a Proper Balance Between Conservation and Development in the Rocky Mountain West,” a new report by Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development, explores the economic benefits of public lands adjacent to rural communities.

Public lands in the Rocky Mountain West are valued for the natural resources that provide fuel, building materials and other commodities and generate jobs and revenue. Yet public lands also are prized for outdoor opportunities, including hunting and angling, and are a magnet for tourists, retirees, businesses and professionals in search of a high quality of life.

Highlights from the report, prepared by Southwick Associates, include the following:

· Counties with a higher percentage of public lands managed for conservation and recreation have higher levels of job and population growth than those with higher percentages of lands managed for commodity production.
· From 1969 to 2009, counties with the highest percentages of lands managed for conservation had higher per-capita income growth rates compared to counties with higher percentages of lands managed for resource development.
· In 2009, the average per-capita income in counties where public lands were managed for conservation and recreation was about $38,000. It was approximately $30,000 in counties where public lands were intensively managed for natural resource extraction.

A case study in the report focuses on Cody, Wyo., a community surrounded by public lands that owes about 10 percent of its jobs to direct spending on fishing, hunting and wildlife viewing.

Join sportsman-conservationist leaders, business owners and Southwick Associates to discuss the report’s findings, including development that conserves the Rocky Mountain West’s renewable resources and secures the region’s economic future.

Speakers to include:
– Brad Powell, energy director, Trout Unlimited
– Rob Southwick, president, Southwick Associates
– Tim Wade, owner, North Fork Anglers, Cody, Wyo., and former Cody County commissioner
– Mike Darby, owner, Irma Hotel, Cody, Wyo., and president, Cody Chamber of Commerce
– Jim Lyon, vice president of conservation policy, National Wildlife Federation

Moderator: Katie McKalip, director of media relations, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership

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