Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘sportsmen’

Last week the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission approved new definitions developed by stakeholders and the Game and Fish Department designed to protect big game migration corridors. The Commission’s vote on Thursday came after more than a year of Mule_deermeetings and new science-based conservation strategies with the aim to mitigate impacts of development and other causes that constrain the animals’ movements.

Wyoming Wildlife Federation (WWF) Field Director Joy Bannon provided testimony in support of the new measures. “Sportsmen support multiple-use management, energy development, grazing, and other uses of our western landscapes, but we believe that all uses must be balanced with wildlife habitat needs,” says Bannon. “Meetings between sportsmen, wildlife managers, and other stakeholders enabled us to collaboratively formulate a reasonable strategy for protecting our migrating elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, and pronghorn.”

The Commission passed the definitions, which will now be included in the department’s mitigation policy. Migration bottlenecks and ungulate stopover areas will be listed as “vital” under the Commission’s mitigation policy. New data has introduced the need to define migratory bottleneck – where animal movement becomes constrained, including a highway or fence – and stopover areas where animals feed and rest during migration. These new policy definitions are important as the Game and Fish Department coordinates with federal land management agencies and state agencies on common goals and decisions regarding energy development, mining, and recreational activities. These definitions represent a victory for Wyoming’s big game animals; important protections as they migrate to and from their seasonal habitats.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

IMG_1025

Photo by Lew Carpenter

Reports from Burns, Oregon indicate that some community members condemn the violent tactics of the Bundy family and the militants but support their goals of turning American public lands over to private owners.

Without question, some in the West—including some citizens in Burns—share the view that the U.S. government’s ownership and management of the region’s public lands are to blame for economic challenges. Yet public opinion research indicates that this view is actually not shared widely in the region.

A large majority of Westerners see public lands as an asset to their state’s economy, not an economic drag. This perspective is confirmed by economic research that shows that areas with more protected public lands

DSCN2143

Photo by Lew Carpenter

have grown at a faster rate than other areas in the West.

Here are five key facts to know about Westerners’ opinions about federal land management agencies, and more information about what has actually caused economic challenges in the rural West:

1) A majority of Westerners approve of the job federal land management agencies are doing.

majority of Western voters approve of the job that the Bureau of Land Management, Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service are each doing. Despite heavy criticism that the Bundy family and militants are directing at the BLM, only 23 percent of Western voters disapprove of the agency’s work.

2) Westerners support keeping public lands public.

Public opinion research conducted by a bipartisan team of pollsters determined that a majority of voters in the American West do not support

IMG_0587

Photo by Lew Carpenter

a transfer of national public lands to state management, and instead believe that these places belong to all Americans.

3) Public lands are an asset, not a drain on local economies.

91% of Western voters believe public lands are an essential part of their state’s economy. They provide a variety of economic benefits such grazing, oil drilling, recreation, and benefits that are not as easily monetizable (like option value). Economic research has shown that Western counties with more protected national public lands have added jobs more than four times faster than counties with fewer protected lands.

4) Many factors are to blame for the very real difficulties faced by the rural West.

Some resource-based economies are struggling because of myriad factors including globalization, the transition to a cleaner energy, and a Western economy increasingly based on knowledge and service industries. Some areas in the West are struggling. While public lands and land managers can be a convenient scapegoat, there’s no data to support the blame.

5) Giving our American lands to the states or private interests is not a panacea for these problems.

The additional burden of managing millions of acres of public lands could break state budgets because the massive costs of fighting wildfires and cleaning up polluting mines would be transferred to state taxpayers. Grazing fees that ranchers pay would triple or quadruple at a minimum. A better option is to engage in collaborative efforts to manage public lands have worked, such as those that have taken place at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

Read Full Post »

Call to Action

Sportsmen:

The Humboldt County Management Sub-Plan is nearing completion, and elk numbers proposed by ranching interests are pitifully low.  Ranchers are essentially demanding that few, if any, elk be allowed west of US 95.  Population objectives of zero in the Jacksons, no more than fifty (50) in the Pine Forest, and 0-10 in the Montanas and Bilk Creeks are being demanded.  You couldn’t find fifty (50) elk with a helicopter in the Pine Forest; what kind of hunting success can we expect.  Here are a few talking points:

  • Sportsmen fund compensation for damage from elk on cultivated fields.
  • Landowner incentive tags are issued when elk live on private range land.
  • Elk and ranching can co-exist with few if any conflicts as documented by the very contentious Central Nevada Elk Plan.
  • There are approximately 65,000 domestic cattle on our public land in Humboldt County.
  • While there are probably a hundred or so ranching interests in Humboldt County, there are 200,000 sportsmen in this state.
  • Elk are so light on the land that forage utilization is often impossible to measure.
  • Over 90% of forage utilization on public land is by domestic livestock.
  • Multiple use management of our public lands mandates the needs of wildlife be considered.
  • Elk can thrive in areas no longer suitable for mule deer whose populations have decreased dramatically.  Elk provide hunting opportunity as well as badly needed wildlife management funding.

 

Please send comments to:  Mr. Eddie Booth, Committee Chairman

Humboldt County Elk Management Sub-Plan Steering Committee

1010 E. National Ave.

Winnemucca, NV 89445

eddie@visionwestrealty.com

 

We need individual’s correspondence prior to December 15.  The ranchers will be out in force.  Let’s stand up for wildlife and sporting opportunity.

Read Full Post »

Washington, D.C. – May 1, 2015 –Leaders in the recreational fishing and boating community yesterday highlighted the

Lew Carpenter with 6.5-pound flounder. Access and habitat rely on re authorization of Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act.

Lew Carpenter with 6.5-pound flounder. Access and habitat rely on re authorization of Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act.

progress in elevating the importance of saltwater recreational fishing in the nation’s primary law governing marine fisheries management. The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources yesterday approved a bill sponsored by Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska), H.R. 1335, to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA), which addresses top priorities of the recreational fishing community.

These priorities were identified by the Commission on Saltwater Recreational Fisheries Management, also known as the Morris-Deal Commission after co-chairs Johnny Morris, founder and CEO of Bass Pro Shops, and Scott Deal, president of Maverick Boats. In 2014, the Morris-Deal Commission released “A Vision for Managing America’s Saltwater Recreational Fisheries,” which includes six key policy changes to produce the full range of saltwater recreational fishing’s social, economic and conservation benefits to the nation.

“The recreational fishing community owes a debt of gratitude to Chairman Rob Bishop and Congressman Don Young for incorporating meaningful changes to recreational fisheries management into the reauthorization of the nation’s marine fisheries law,” said Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Coastal Conservation. “The Morris-Deal Report set forth a vision for the future of saltwater recreational fishing, and this bill would help to achieve that vision.”

“The nation’s 11 million saltwater recreational anglers have a $70 billion economic impact annually and support 450,000 jobs,” said Mike Nussman, president and CEO of the American Sportfishing Association. “However, federal marine fisheries management has never sufficiently acknowledged the importance of recreational fishing to the nation. H.R. 1335 would enact many of the necessary changes to elevate saltwater recreational fishing to the level it deserves.”

The recommendations of the Morris-Deal Commission include:

– Establishing a national policy for recreational fishing
– Adopting a revised approach to saltwater recreational fisheries management
– Allocating marine fisheries for the greatest benefit to the nation
– Creating reasonable latitude in stock rebuilding timelines
– Codifying a process for cooperative management
Managing for the forage base

“Management that emphasizes conservation and abundance, and allows for consistent access to public resources for saltwater anglers, was at the heart of the recommendations made by the Morris-Deal Commission,” said Whit Fosburgh, president and CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership. “Including those recommendations into legislation aimed at improving our nation’s fisheries management means Congress is recognizing the importance of angling to American culture and our economy.”

“The broad coalition of leading recreational fishing and boating organizations that has come together to support our community’s priorities should be pleased with this bill,” said Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance. “RFA is proud to have participated as part of this coalition.”

One of the recommendations of the Morris-Deal Commission was addressed by an amendment offered by Congressman Jeff Duncan (R-S.C.) that would prompt a review of quota allocations in fisheries in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico with both a commercial and recreational component. Despite the tremendous importance that allocation decisions have in maximizing the benefits that our fisheries provide to the nation, federal fisheries managers have not revisited allocations – most of which were determined decades ago – primarily because of a lack of clear guidance on how decisions should be made and because these decisions are inherently difficult.

“Congressman Duncan’s amendment is a significant achievement for ensuring that the benefits of our nation’s fisheries are maximized,” said Jeff Crane, president of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation. “For far too long, allocations have been rusted shut, and we applaud Congressman Duncan for his leadership on this critically important issue.”

A separate amendment offered by Congressman Garret Graves (R-La.) that would transfer management Gulf of Mexico red snapper to the five Gulf states failed to be included. However, there was widespread agreement expressed by committee members that Gulf red snapper management is broken and in need of significant changes.

“Rep. Graves is a great leader for sportsmen and women in the Gulf Coast,” said Angers. “He understands the challenges of sound resource management and is working to get anglers back on the water.”

“We hope that as MSA moves forward there will be additional opportunities to enact the Gulf states’ plan,” said Patrick Murray, president of the Coastal Conservation Association. “MSA’s reauthorization surely has a long road ahead, but H.R. 1335 provides the recreational fishing community with a very solid first step.”

###

The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) is the sportfishing industry’s trade association committed to representing the interests of the entire sportfishing community. We give the industry a unified voice, speaking out on behalf of sportfishing and boating industries, state and federal natural resource agencies, conservation organizations, angler advocacy groups and outdoor journalists when emerging laws and policies could significantly affect sportfishing business or sportfishing itself. ASA invests in long-term ventures to ensure the industry will remain strong and prosperous, as well as safeguard and promote the enduring social, economic and conservation values of sportfishing in America. ASA also gives America’s 60 million anglers a voice in policy decisions that affect their ability to sustainably fish on our nation’s waterways through KeepAmericaFishing™, our angler advocacy campaign. America’s anglers generate over $48 billion in retail sales with a $115 billion impact on the nation’s economy creating employment for more than 828,000 people.

Read Full Post »

2015/01/img_1350.png

Download a PDF version

This NSSF report details the significant economic impact the firearms and ammunition industry has on the nation’s and each state’s economy.

The economic growth America’s firearms and ammunition industry has experienced over the years has been nothing short of remarkable. Over the past couple of years, the industry’s growth has been driven by an unprecedented number of Americans choosing to exercise their fundamental right to keep and bear arms and purchase a firearm and ammunition.

NSSF, representing manufacturers and sportsmen around the nation, takes great pride in supporting wildlife conservation efforts. Noted in the economic impact report are the significant taxes paid by member companies to federal and state governments and the Pittman-Robertson excise tax the industry pays on the products it sells — this tax is the major source of wildlife conservation funding in America.

During difficult economic times and high unemployment rates nationally, our industry has grown and created over 25,600 new, well-paying jobs over the past two years. Our industry is proud to be one of the bright spots in this economy.

Take a look for yourself and see the impact we have nationally and on your home state.

The Firearms Industry Creates Jobs in America

United States companies that manufacture, distribute and sell sporting firearms, ammunition and supplies are an important part of the country’s economy. Manufacturers of firearms, ammunition and supplies, along with the companies that sell and distribute these products, provide well-paying jobs in America and pay significant amounts in tax to the state and federal governments.

Economic Impact of the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Industry in the U.S.

An Important Part of America’s Economy
image
Companies in the United States that manufacture, distribute and sell firearms, ammunition and hunting equipment employ as many as 111,895 people in the country and generate an additional 133,850 jobs in supplier and ancillary industries. These include jobs in companies supplying goods and services to manufacturers, distributors and retailers, as well as those that depend on sales to workers in the firearms and ammunition industry. [1]

These are good jobs, paying an average of $47,709 in wages and benefits. And today, every job is important. In fact, in the United States the unemployment rate has reached 7.5 percent. This means that there are already 11,660,000 people trying to find jobs in the nation and collecting unemployment benefits. [2]

The Economic Benefit of the Industry Spreads Throughout the Country

Not only does the manufacture and sale of firearms and hunting supplies create good jobs in the United States but the industry also contributes to the economy as a whole. In fact, in 2013 the firearms and ammunition industry was responsible for as much as $37.7 billion in total economic activity in the country.

The Country Also Benefits from the Taxes Paid by the Industry
image
The firearms and ammunition industry generates sizable tax revenues. In the United States the industry and its employees pay over $5.2 billion in taxes including property, income, and sales-based levies. [3]

[1] John Dunham and Associates, New York, September 2013. Direct impacts include those jobs in firearms and ammunition manufacturers, as well as companies that manufacture products such as ammunition holders and magazines, cases, decoys, game calls, holsters, hunting equipment, scopes, clay pigeons and targets. Direct impacts also include those resulting from the wholesale distribution and retailing of firearms and ammunition in sporting goods retailers and variety/mass merchandise stores.
[2] The Bureau of Labor Statistics. Available online at: http://www.bis.gov/lau/home.htm
[3] This is in addition to over $2.86 billion in federal business taxes and $643.92 million in federal excise taxes.
Source: John Dunham and Associates, Inc. New York, New York 2013

Read Full Post »

DSCN2835.JPG

The recent efforts to turn public lands back to the states is a far-fetched, and blatant attack on American values. Our public lands are both a legacy handed to all Americans by great leaders of the past, and an essential, critical value to the generations that follow. The public lands that we recreate upon feed our collective soul, nurture and protect the wildlife and habitat within and build jobs related to a sustainable resource intrinsic to our very existence. The price for clean air, water and land is tied to this basic asset within our borders.

A growing number of Western states and lawmakers, both state and federal, are calling for the take-over or sale of public lands. Sportsmen and other outdoor and wildlife enthusiasts oppose attempts to dismantle our public-lands heritage and will fight to see that our public lands stay in public hands.

Surveys and reports, including a recent one by Backcountry Hunters & Anglers, show that more than two-thirds of hunters in 11 Western states depend on public lands for all or part of their hunting. Without access to public lands, many of us wouldn’t be able to go hunting or fishing.

Getting rid of our public lands would be a serious blow to our state and national economies. In Colorado, outdoor recreation contributes more than $13 billion to the economy. Nationwide, it generates $646 billion in consumer spending and directly supports 6.1 million jobs.

These schemes for states to take over public lands are a solution in search of a problem. Survey after survey show that Coloradans and other Westerners love their public lands. This year, a Colorado College poll found that three-fourths of voters in the Rockies oppose selling public lands to balance the budget and nearly all of them visited public lands in the past year.

Public lands belong to all Americans. They’re our birthright. They were conserved for us and future generations by people from both political parties and all kinds of backgrounds. We owe it our children and grandchildren to fight to keep public lands in public hands so they can enjoy the benefits we have.

States that want to seize public lands say they can do a better job of managing them, but what happens when they figure out they don’t have the money and other resources? The states will start selling our public lands to the highest bidders and we’ll all be the losers.

DSCN1394.JPG

Read Full Post »

Today, one of America’s leading wildlife conservation groups released a report outlining 47 projects that would improve the health of the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of the 2010 oil spillDSCN2879

“We can’t undo the oil spill, but we can take concrete steps to make the Gulf of Mexico a better place for fish and wildlife,” said Steve Bender, director of National Wildlife Federation’s Vanishing Paradise campaign. “This type of comprehensive habitat restoration will measurably boost populations of fish and waterfowl.”

Restoring the Gulf of Mexico for People and Wildlife: Recommended Projects and Priorities takes a broad look at restoration efforts that would benefit all five Gulf Coast states—Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. The recommendations emphasize restoring the areas where rivers flow into the Gulf of Mexico, such as the Mississippi River Delta. These places are important nurseries for marine life and provide wintering habitat for waterfowl.

Money for restoration projects could come from the billions that BP and the other companies responsible for the 2010 spill will pay in fines and penalties. Much of this money will ultimately be distributed to the Gulf states for restoration.

“Over the past hundred years, we’ve made major changes to the way our rivers flow into the Gulf of Mexico,” added Bender. “The results have not been pretty for fish and wildlife. Restoring degraded coastal habitats will help numerous species of fish and these habitats are also critical for the millions of waterfowl that winter or stopover on the Gulf Coast.”

The report’s 47 proposals can be grouped into these five general categories:

1. Restoring Wetlands: Wetlands play a critical role in the Gulf ecosystem—creating habitat for fish and wildlife, filtering pollutants, stabilizing shorelines and providing protection from storms. Over the past eight decades, the Gulf Coast has lost an area of wetlands larger than the state of state of Delaware, largely in the area of Louisiana known as the Mississippi River Delta.

2. Restoring Sediment: The Mississippi River is hemmed in by man-made levees; the river sediment that once nourished the delta’s wetlands is now propelled deep into the Gulf. If all of the 19 recommended projects in Louisiana were built, together they would sustain, restore and rebuild as many as 300 square miles of wetlands that would otherwise be lost by 2060.

3. Restoring the Balance between Fresh and Saltwater: Estuaries are created where fresh water from rivers mixes with saltwater from the Gulf. In most of the Gulf’s estuaries the natural balance of fresh and salt water has been dramatically altered. The report recommends fixes for many of the Gulf’s major estuaries, including the Everglades and Apalachicola Bay in Florida as well as five systems in Texas.

4. Restoring Oyster Reefs: An adult oyster can filter as much as 50 gallons of water per day, and oyster reefs provide important habitat for many economically important species of fish, such as redfish, shrimp, and blue crabs. Oyster reefs also create physical structures that can protect coastal communities from storms. Restoring oyster reefs is a key element in several of the recommended projects in the report, for example in Mississippi’s Biloxi Bay and Bay St. Louis.

5. Protecting Critical Landscapes: In a few select places, the report recommends purchasing key parcels of coastal lands to protect them in perpetuity. For example, the report recommends adding lands to Alabama’s Grand Bay and Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuges.

The report is aimed at informing a series of decisions that will be ultimately made for funds flowing from the Gulf oil disaster, including those to be made by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council. The federal-state council is tasked with implementing a comprehensive restoration plan to include a list of projects prioritized for their impact on the Gulf ecosystem. The council recently released a list of projects and programs proposed for funding with oil spill penalty money.

“America’s hunters and anglers want to enjoy a restored Gulf of Mexico,” said Bender. “We owe it to future generations to make sure the oil spill dollars are spent on projects that will really make a difference.”

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: